New Texas Chainsaw Massacre Will Be Hipsters vs. Leatherface

Home Technology New Texas Chainsaw Massacre Will Be Hipsters vs. Leatherface
New Texas Chainsaw Massacre Will Be Hipsters vs. Leatherface
Holding his trademark chainsaw, Leatherface stands silhouetted in a doorway in a scene from 2022's Texas Chainsaw Massacre.
Saw is family!
Photo: Yana Blajeva / ©2021 Legendary, Courtesy of Netflix

As the world turns, another Texas Chainsaw Massacre sequel arrives, doing its best to recapture the grim, grimy magic wrought by the 1974 horror classic. But the next entry in the series, which arrives on Netflix in February, borrows a page from the current Halloween films by billing itself as a direct sequel to Tobe Hooper’s original. It will also introduce a new kind of prey for Leatherface (Mark Burnham) and his cannibal family: hipsters!

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Speaking to Entertainment Weekly, Fede Álvarez—aka the guy who did a pretty darn good job with that 2013 Evil Dead reboot; he also made 2016’s Don’t Breathe—says 2022’s Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which he co-wrote and produced, is the product of people who are huge fans of the franchise, including himself. As such, it’ll attempt to do justice to the film that started it all. “We wanted to come up with a very simple premise [with] a powerful domino effect. Everything is set up in the right place—all you have to do is push the first domino and everything will happen effortlessly.”

 Elsie Fisher as Lila, Sarah Yarkin as Melody, Nell Hudson as Ruth, and Jacob Latimore as Dante.
Elsie Fisher as Lila, Sarah Yarkin as Melody, Nell Hudson as Ruth, and Jacob Latimore as Dante.
Photo: Yana Blajeva / ©2021 Legendary, Courtesy of Netflix

Those dominos include, of course, young city folk, including Castle Rock’s Elsie Fisher, who cross paths with Texas Chainsaw’s backwoods killers, still lurking after 50 years. “I think the first movie really hit a nerve when portraying that culture clash between the countryside and the city. Back in the ‘70s, the hippies were representing the youth of the city,” Álvarez said. “This time, they’re more like millennial hipsters from Austin who are very entrepreneurial and have a dream of getting away from the city and back to the countryside. They’re trying to gentrify small-town America—and let’s just say they encounter some pushback.”